Thursday, September 23, 2010

Darkness On The Edge Of Town

This coming November, Bruce Springsteen will release "The Promise: Darkness On The Edge Of Town".  It's six hours of film and more than two hours of audio across 3 CDs and 3 DVDs including a documentary on the making of the album "Darkness On The Edge Of Town".  As a 30 year Springsteen fan, I anxiously await its release.

Over the years, Robert Prechter of Elliott Wave International has made some great comparisons between mass social mood, financial markets, and the mood of music and movies.  He's presented exhaustive analysis on how music and movie themes align with the mass social mood of the people.  As I was reading articles about Springsteen's upcoming re-release of "The Darkness" record, I started to wonder how the timing of both releases would present itself in relation to the financial markets.

"Darkness was an angry record. I took the 10 toughest songs I had.I didn't want something with a broader, more compassionate overview. That didn't feel right to me."
Bruce Springsteen (Interview with Edward Norton at the Toronto International Film Festival, Sept. 2010)

The chart below presents the Dow Jones Industrial Average Gold Ratio with the two dates for the release of "Darkness On The Edge Of Town".  My hypothesis proves to be true.  Both releases align with a downward trending cycle.
Dow Jones Industrial Average Gold Ratio

DARKNESS ON THE EDGE OF TOWN
They're still racing out at the Trestles,
But that blood it never burned in her veins,
Now I hear she's got a house up in Fairview,
And a style she's trying to maintain.
Well, if she wants to see me,
You can tell her that I'm easily found,
Tell her there's a spot out 'neath Abram's Bridge,
And tell her, there's a darkness on the edge of town.
Everybody's got a secret, Sonny,
Something that they just can't face,
Some folks spend their whole lives trying to keep it,
They carry it with them every step that they take.
Till some day they just cut it loose
Cut it loose or let it drag 'em down,
Where no one asks any questions,
or looks too long in your face,
In the darkness on the edge of town.
Some folks are born into a good life,
Other folks get it anyway, anyhow,
I lost my money and I lost my wife,
Them things don't seem to matter much to me now.
Tonight I'll be on that hill 'cause I can't stop,
I'll be on that hill with everything I got,
Lives on the line where dreams are found and lost,
I'll be there on time and I'll pay the cost,
For wanting things that can only be found
In the darkness on the edge of town.

P.S. Happy Birthday Bruce!

3 comments:

pinotblack said...

With the much-anticipated release of the commemorative box set for Darkness on the Edge of Town slated for this November, Bruce Springsteen's classic record is getting renewed attention in the music world. Fans are surely hungry for all the historic material they can get from the 1978 recording sessions and subsequent tour.

For our own preview of what's to come, we contacted Dick Wingate, who was intimately involved in the launch and marketing of the album and tour. He offers an insider's view of what the Darkness era meant to Bruce and the band, while painting an often-humorous behind-the-scenes account of some of the tour's highlights.

Enjoy, and be certain to check out the book The Light in Darkness, which one fan said, "… would make a great companion piece to the commemorative Darkness box set…"
PLUS: A full tribute page to Springsteen's appearance at this year's TIFF festival where he chatted one on one with friend and actor Ed Norton, and premiered his new documentary The Promise

Peter O'Hardon said...

Hopefully Prechter's analysis is a bit more comprehensive. One mad album from the Boss does not a trend make.

Kirk Barrell said...

Peter,
That's a fair statement. My post was a miniscule snippet relating to the theory. For more details, you can download Prechter's report here: http://www.socionomics.net/free-socionomics-reports/popular-culture/default.aspx